CVN 79

Construction is already well underway.

Ready for the 21st Century

John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) is the second aircraft carrier in the Ford Class. It is also the second aircraft carrier built by Newport News Shipbuilding named for JFK. Like its forerunner CVN 78, Kennedy is a truly electric aircraft carrier, with many of the systems powered by steam on Nimitz-class carriers now powered by electricity. The ship is designed to save the Navy $4 billion in total ownership cost over the ship's 50-year lifespan, with fewer overall components, extended drydocking interval, improved ship-wide air conditioning, and more.

Using Digital Technology

Newport News Shipbuilding is embracing digital data like never before in building aircraft carriers. From eliminating paper drawings and work instructions to using product model data to plan wire ways, digital data is finding its way into the heart of every process at the shipyard—and is already saving money on construction of John F. Kennedy (CVN 79). Learn more about digital shipbuilding on the Ford class

 Building for
Affordability

As shipbuilders continue construction on
Kennedy, the challenge is to reduce the cost of each
consecutive ship in the Ford Class while maintaining the class’
increased capability. Shipbuilders have captured tens of thousands of lessons-learned
from the process of building Gerald R. Ford, many that are already being
implemented as cost-saving initiatives in building Kennedy. Learn more

Tale of Two Kennedys

On May 27, 1967, a crowd estimated at more than 30,000 poured into Newport News Shipbuilding to witness the launch of the aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy (CVA 67). The crowd watched as the president's daughter, Caroline Kennedy, performed her ceremonial duty as Ship's Sponsor - smashing a bottle of American sparking wine across the bow of the ship.

Caroline Kennedy, former U.S. Ambassador to Japan, is the Ship's Sponsor for the second aircraft carrier named for her father.

Photo: Caroline Kennedy smashes a bottle of American sparking wine across the bow of John F. Kennedy (CVA 67) in 1967. Image courtesy of the Daily Press.